LOZA Begins The Manufacture of Face Masks

Left to right, Michael Moges, (Purchasing Manager), Yenenesh Manaye, Mekdes Alaye, Enatfanta Fetene, Helina Engeda (Manager of Operations), Belayneh Tazebku (Marketing Director), look on as the first face mask is produced at the LOZA manufacturing facility in their synagogue, in Kechene Ethiopia. Besides employing members of the community, proceeds will be used for COVID-19 related needs, and some face masks will be donated to the local clinic.

U.S. and Israeli Delegation Visit Kechene Synagogue for Friday Shabbat Services Nov. 15, 2019

Rabbis Gila Colman and Josh Bennett begin service with parsha for the week
Rabbis Gila Colman and Josh Bennett teaching and learning a Hebrew and Amharic song, Ma yafet hayom

Community member speaks
Community member asks a question
Mesfin Assefa
Rabbi Josh Bennett giving mezuzahs to congragation
David Goldberg
Alue
Suzi Colman
Shehekianu
Belayneh and Messfin blessing their children
Rabbi Josh Bennett talking about partnerships and then blessing children
Rabbi Josh Bennett blessing over wine
Rabbi Gila Colman presents shirts
Belayneh and Messfin blessing their children
Jon Colman
David Goldberg
Suzi Colman
Rabbi Josh Bennett, you must be are partners
Rabbi Josh Bennett, blessing of wine
Rabbi Gila Ruskin greeting the congregation
Blessing of the bread
Mikki leading Amharic prayer 1
Mikki leading Amharic prayer 2
Mikki leading Amharic prayer 3
Rabbi Gila Colman passing out Shabbat candles
Placeing the mezuzaj on synagogue door
David Goldberg
Mikki ending service
Mikkki leading Amharic prayer
Mikkie leading Amharic prayer
Mikki leading Amharic prayer
Rabbi Gila Colman talking about Suzi
Rabbi Josh Bennett explaining a mezuzah
Rabbi Josh Bennett explaining the weekly parsha of Abraham and visitors to his tent
Rabbi Josh Bennett explains and give a mezuzah to each member and affixes it to door post
Scheceanu and Am Yisrael Chai

The Beta Israel Community of North Shewa Ethiopia, Short Video

The Zone of North Shewa in the Amhara region of Ethiopia has been proposed for establishing a community-based development program focusing on agricultural and artisan craft. The communities of the area have ancestral roots related to Beta Israel communities of Gondar and are related to the community of Kechene in Addis. The video provides an introductory view into the knowledge-based development program that is being launched.

First Rosh Hashanah Services in Debra Brehan

 October 3, 2019 0 Minutes      Rate This

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This is the first Rosh Hashanah service held in Debra Brehan Ethiopia in probably 500 years. It was attended by about 50 people. Michael Moges, who led the service, was trained over the past several months, by Conservative Rabbi Gershom Sizomu from the Abayudaya community in Uganda. Michael wants to become an ordained Rabbi. There is small synagogue in Kechene Ethiopia for the Beta Israel community, but not in Debra Brehan, the heart of this community.

How Can I Help?

By Suzi Colman

March 7, 2019

As Dr. Malka Shabtay and I traveled to Cleveland, SE FL, and Detroit telling the story of the Beta Israel Community of N. Shewa Ethiopia, several people have asked us how they can help. We have engaged CultivAid, an Israeli NGO and an expert in determining the economic, security, health, and education needs of the community. This report should be available by June. We hope, before then, to develop person to person programs, gather donations and assist those that want to visit the community in N. Shewa. However, immediately we have identified one critical need.  Two members of the Beta Israel community wish to spend time with Rabbi Gershom Sizomu from the Abayudaya Jewish community in Uganda.  Rabbi Sizomu is a Conservative Rabbi, ordained at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, at the American Jewish University, in Los Angles.

The cost will be $2,000 per month, for transportation and room and board, for 4 months, for of total of $8,000 for both men. They will bring back skills for building a Jewish community in N. Shewa. One day, they may formalize their training and become ordained rabbis.  The two members of the Beta Israel community of N. Shewa, who have volunteered to go to Uganda are, Michael Moges Demsse, and Eldad Eshete Bekele.  Here, in their own words, are the reason they want to go:

”My name is Michael Moges. I am from the Beta Israel community of Kechene, a local village in Addis Ababa. In 1996, a legal synagogue called ENSZO, was established for the practice of Judaism, with our ancestral Judaic faith traditions. At that time I was only 15, and I felt and knew, that this is the place I belong.

I started my journey to Judaism, and it took me a while before I discovered the larger Jewish community’s teachings, customs and religious beliefs in the world. It was my wish to learn and speak Hebrew that led me to the discovery of different Rabbis and their teachings, and this inspired my learning and taught me the way to live, along with all the beauty of commandments. This led me to discover more and more, for this and to live as a Jew, by fulfilling the Mitzvahs, to live up to them, and help other synagogue members fulfill the dream.

In our synagogue we have no Rabbi, and a formal way of learning Judaism. We gather knowledge and information from the internet, which is not a formal way of learning Judaism. By learning and becoming a Rabbi, I will get back to my community by leading and guiding them to the profound reality of Judaism. By becoming the first Rabbi, I will help others to fulfill their religious and spiritual obligations and in their endeavors.”

“My name is Eldad Bekele. I was born in Addis Ababa Ethiopia on June 1st in 1991. I am 27 years old. I am living in Addis Ababa and my village is Kechene, known as North Shewa Beta Israel. I started my education when I was four years old and went to a national school in 1998. Then, after I finished grade twelve, I went to a university to study my field, for three years of studies at Woliat Sodo University, I graduated in English Language and Literature. After graduation I started a job as an English teacher in a private school, where I have taught English for five years.

 I was searching my identity because my friends and I were called names in high school. They called us Buda, which means evil eye, and there was a lot of discrimination. When we began to search and connect ritual from the view of Judaism, I was interested about modern Judaism then searching and asking about a lot of question about Judaism. Now I am very eager to learn more about modern Judaism. The reason that I want to learn about modern Judaism is that I will teach my synagogue members, and the community more about modern Judaism. This means a lot to me, to bridge and connect the other Jewish brothers to our community. If I could become a Rabbi or religious teacher, will be a very great chance to teach the community members with the modern teachings of Judaism.

I have a very good skills with the computer, good writing skills and good communication skills, writing short story, poems and music are some of my skills.

I am participating in the religious group to give services for High Holidays, and working in public relation for three years on now.”

If you are interested in helping to fund this need you can do so on our donation page, or contact me directly.

Suzi Colman

248-342-5978

suzijon@gmail.com

The Re-Emerging Beta Israel Community in N. Shewa, Ethiopia

suzi colman

February 24, 2019

Go to the profile of suzi colman

As is customary for me when entering a country I have not previously visited, upon arriving in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, I inquired, “Is there a synagogue?” I always enjoy meeting members of the local Jewish community, learning about their customs, and visiting their synagogues or temples. This time, I was entirely unprepared for what I discovered, and it was simultaneously astonishing and deeply disturbing.

 A little history. Originally, the Beta Israel of N.Shewa were part of the Beta Israel community that lived in Gondar. Gondar is the area where over 100,000 Jews immigrated to Israel, and eight thousand still remain. Approximately 400 years ago, some ancestors of the Gondar Jews migrated to N. Shewa, located some 50 miles north of Addis Ababa for better land. Approximately 100 years ago, a number of Beta Israel of N. Shewa,, at the request of the king of Ethiopia, traveled from North Shewa to Addis Ababa to construct his new palace because they are so skilled at crafts and building. They lived in a poor community, Kechene, on the outskirts of Addis Ababa, where their descendants live to this day. Thus, the Beta Israel of N. Shewa today live both in N. Shewa and in Kechene.

For centuries, many Ethiopian Jews from the Beta Israel community in N. Shewa have been persecuted by their Ethiopian Christian neighbors, who believe they possess “the evil eye.” They believed, and, incredibly, continue today to believe, that if a Jew looks at you, you may become ill and die. They have been accused of being “Buda” which means that they turn into hyena at night and attack their neighbors. As a result, when a Christian Ethiopian experiences illness or dies, gentile Ethiopians may randomly select a Jew and kill him or burn down his home. But this is not merely ancient history. Just recently, a Jew’s house was torched, two brothers were killed and a sister badly burned. The home was totally destroyed. The crime may go unpunished.

For centuries, this community has lived in continuous fear. As a result, the Beta Israel of N. Shewa and Kechene have been forced to practice their Judaism discreetly, and lived separately and apart from their Christian neighbors. They are relegated to livelihoods considered beneath the dignity of most Ethiopians. They are primarily craftsman, blacksmiths, potters, weavers and builders. They have little social contact with them, and only married among their own community. They continued to practice their Jewish customs and holidays, and were a religion that combined Jewish and Christian beliefs. Just as Christians accept much of the Old Testament, this community also accepts many Christian teachings. It is important to appreciate that this community is much different from the Ashkenazi and Sephardic tradition which would be considered to be, in an ethnocentric way, as traditional Jewish.

The Beta Israel community is monastic, and their “Gedams” are possibly a place for religious services but also, apparently, of study and for refuge. Accordingly,,it is not entirely clear what a “Gedam” is. As a monastic community, a Gedam appears to be, simultaneously, a place where religious leaders might reside, where refuge is possible and, seemingly, where prayers and rituals may take place. Are they synagogues? We think so, but we do not know. What we know is that I was told that there were once 44 Gedams located among the mountains, forests and caves, inaccessible by road, and always near a river and that today, a mere 15 remain, most of which have never been seen by outsiders. We also know that by sending a delegation to investigate, we may learn whether Gedams indeed qualify as synagogues, or whether they are something distinct.

Most of the Beta Israel of N. Shewa live outwardly as Christians. They may go to Church on Sunday but continue to practice Jewish customs, traditions, and observe most Jewish holidays. Despite centuries of persecution by their Christian neighbors, these Jews steadfastly hold on to their beliefs. To a great extent because of their isolation. There are now emerging leaders in the community that want to follow, what we would consider the Jewish normative, with no Christian beliefs, and the importance of the Hebrew language, and a connection to Israel. They do not want to continue hiding their Jewish roots from their children, and wish to reconnect to Ethiopian Jewish community and the rest of the world. 

Approximately 15 years ago, a group of young Hidden Jews in Kechene decided it was time to stop hiding. This became the focal point of a serious internal dispute as the elders feared increased persecution. Ultimately, the young Jews formed their own synagogue in Kechene called Beta Selam, which means House of Peace. It is officially registered in Addis Ababa as Ethiopian N. Shewa Zionist Organization. As a direct result of creating this new synagogue, many of its organizing members have lost their jobs, their friends and their social status.

While in Ethiopia, I met with two of the leaders of the Beta Israel of N. Shewa. Belayneh Tazebku, the designated leader of the Beta Israel of N. Shewa, and Michael Moges, a fellow congregant who desperately desires to become a rabbi. Because there is no place to study to become a rabbi in Ethiopia, Michael wants to study overseas.

These men sharedthe sad history of the Beta Israel of N. Shewa and their hopes and dreams for themselves and for the community. These Jews receive no assistance from the Diaspora. Belayneh and Michael believe that Americans don’t know about them, and, as they informed me, they believe Israel won’t help them until it is finished helping the Falas Mara from Gondar who are still waiting to make Aliyah to Israel.. They implored me to share their story in the United States. Michael and Belayneh desperately desire to live openly as Jews, free from persecution. They requested I contact two Israelis, Irene Orleansky and Malka Shabtay, who knew of their plight.

Irene Orleansky is an Israeli who, in 2016, filmed a documentary about the Beta Israel of N. Shewa called “Bal Ej the Hidden Jews of Ethiopia”. She filmed two of the Hidden Synagogues and the Jews observing their holidays and practicing Jewish customs. Dr. Malka Shabtay is an applied anthropologist who has been studying and working with Ethiopian Jews in Israel for more than 37 years. She first heard about these “hidden” Jews nearly 25 years ago at a conference featuring Professor Richard Pankhurst, a historian who documented the connection between this community and the Beta Israel of Gondar. Not much occurred in the intervening years, until approximately one year ago, when an old friend of Dr. Shabtay confided in her that he was an Ethiopian Jew. He relayed to her the story of the Jews from N. Shewa. She has been working with this friend and the Beta Israel of N. Shewa community ever since.

The initial goal for the N Shewa community is to gain public recognition so that they might obtain better education and improved living conditions. In order to assist, Dr. Shabtay has approached Israel officials who possess the authority to make these goals a reality, including an Israeli-Ethiopian Parliament member, an Israeli Supreme court attorney and two Rabbis. She also has met with the head of Non-Sectarian initiatives of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the North American Conference of Ethiopian Jews and other Jewish agencies helping Jews around the world. To date, Israel has not reviewed the matter of the Jews of N Shewa. That is, the Israeli government has yet to determine that they are, in fact, Jews. In talking with Dr. Shabtay, it became apparent that there exists a matrix of complex, political, economic, racial and religious factors precluding the immigration to Israel of the remaining Gondar Jews. Nonetheless, Dr. Shabtay presses forward, enlisting the good will of volunteers who seek to preserve this community.

We are also sending a Rabbinic student to Uganda to study under Rabbi Gershom Sizomu, a native born member of the Abuyadaba Jewish community in Uganda. He is an ordained Conservative Rabbi, who studied at the Zeigler School of Rabbinic Studies at the American Jewish University in Los Angeles. The person chosen is very capable and excited and could be the first Rabbi of Ethiopia. His name is Michael Moges, and he shared with me that now after work, he comes home and studies Hebrew until late at night. In the morning, he wakes up for the first time in his life with hope. He wrote me in his words what that means to him and to the whole community.

“Hope, people need hope to go through life, without hope efforts became meaningless and minimal. I got energetic and felt purpose when Suzi Colman told me about the studying of rabbinical courses. Since then I have started to work on different areas needed for the study such as Hebrew lessons. I have picked up my Hebrew lesson from where I stopped earlier also studying late at night and early in the morning. I have improved on speaking, reading and listening and writing skills. For me to study a rabbinical course is to live and improve my spiritual life here in this world and in the next to come. This study is a very different and unique experience from all other materialistic life endeavors. This is a journey of a Jewish soul back to its roots. I met with a person from Israel named Tomer, and we had a long chat and he started to talk about how amazing and great Ethiopia is and so on, then after explaining his passion and love for Ethiopia he said “I some times think that in my previous life I used to be an Ethiopian” I then replied “For me I think in my previous life I used to be a Jewish living in Yerushalaim”

Toda raba for everything”

Independently, Malka Shabtay dispatched an Israeli company, CultivAid, already working in Ethiopia, to determine the needs of the Beta Israel community of N. Shewa. CultivAid will provide, in early 2019, an assessment of the human services, agricultural, education needs of this community. We will pursue an appeal to the Diaspora to help these people as needed. It may take time before the Israeli government and the Jewish organizations will be ready to recognize and officially support this community, so until that happens, we, few individual volunteers, took upon ourselves to do our best for the survival of this special community, and go with them hand in hand until they will return to where they originally belong, to the people of Israel. 

Most likely this community will need improved sustainable agriculture for food, and improved health care. Additionally, the education system is most likely inadequate, and they will need Jewish education and to learn Hebrew. As they continued their practices of many of the customs of Judaism, with more political freedom and enlightenment in Ethiopia, some are now returning to their roots as a re-emerging Jewish community on their own. Many more thirst for Jewish knowledge after this 500 year hiatus. Numerous Israeli young adults stand ready and willing to travel to Ethiopia as volunteers, but as of today, there is no money to provide them with appropriate and safe housing. The Beta Israel of N .Shewa have no money to pay staff to oversee the needs of their Gedams/unagogues and while members willingly volunteer, it is all they can do just to take care of their families and survive. Of course, there are many other needs, most of which we, as Jews privileged to live in this country, never have to concern ourselves with.

Ashes from burned down Jewish home